October 25, 2014

Elyria
Cloudy
51°F
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Mayoral hopeful gets early word out

ELYRIA — The summer heat hasn’t even begun to subside yet, but mayoral candidates already have their eyes on November and independent candidate Tim Quinn is leading the early charge with a series of fliers and a door-to-door run through the city.

“I want the people to know me and I knew I had to start early,” Quinn said.

Quinn, who is running on a platform of operating the city like a business, started sending out fliers at the beginning of June, far ahead of his competitors, incumbent Mayor Bill Grace, a Democrat, and Republican John Howard Jr.

“A lot of people ask, ‘Who is Tim Quinn?’ Well, I am going to let them know, and the best way I know to do that is to get out and meet them,” said Quinn, a retired construction company owner.

Since June, Quinn said he and his family members have canvassed most of the 1st, 6th and 7th wards, with plans to hit the other four well before the election.

“I know what people think — ‘he’s too old to be walking door to door’ — but I got news for them. I am in good shape,” the 65-year-old Quinn said.

Quinn said he decided to get an early start on the campaign in part because he is running against a strong two-term Democratic incumbent and a Republican with an extremely well-known name in the city.

Howard, who shares his name with his father, the late Elyria Municipal Court Judge John A. Howard, who served from 1984 to 1990 and was the first black judge in Lorain County, did not return calls seeking comment.

Grace hasn’t started the visible portion of his campaign but said he plans to get everything under way in September.

“We’re making preparations right now, and as is typical, we will start the visible part of the campaign around Labor Day,” Grace said. “We will be heading out to community events, things like the Apple Festival, and do what we’ve done in previous campaigns, talking about what we’ve done and what we plan to do.”

Grace beat Elyria school board member Holly Brinda in the Democratic primary in May by 512 votes, collecting 3,984 votes compared with Brinda’s 3,472.

Grace spent $29,327 during the campaign, with $9,873 of it spent on advertising. He is headed into the November election with $11,658 on hand. Grace, however, said he did not know how much he planned to spend on the election.

Quinn declined to say how much he expected to spend on his campaign but did say that he would be taking out a loan to make up for any budget shortfalls compared with his competitors.

Contact Joe Medici at 329-7152 or jmedici@chroniclet.com.