December 18, 2014

Elyria
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Avon chef keeps a hungry Tribe satisfied

The 2007 American League Championship is so close, the Indians can taste it.

STEVE MANHEIM/CHRONICLE
Local chef Paul Jagielski keeps the Indians fed at Jacobs Field.

 

WHAT’S TO EAT?

Today’s post-batting practice menu reads a little something like this:
• Sauteed shrimp with vegetables in light pesto marinara sauce with cavatappi pasta
• Turkey lasagna Sauteed chicken with herbs and olive oil tossed in penne pasta
• Turkey burgers
• Grilled chicken breast sandwiches
• Platters of chicken and tuna salad
• Fresh fruit and salad bar
• Deli trays with several varieties of bread
• Sushi
• Smoothies
• Yogurt

To get it all done, Jagielski will prepare:
• 7 or 8 pounds of shrimp
• 8 or 9 pounds of chicken
• 15 to 20 pounds of pasta
• Four pineapples
• Half a flat of strawberries
• One watermelon

But first, they will need to hit the field tonight ready to win. It’s their last home game of the series, and they are just one win away from heading to the big show.  With that kind of pressure, there is no way they can head out tonight on an empty stomach.

And that’s a problem local chef Paul Jagielski is ready to knock out of the ballpark.

While many may know Jagielski as the chef and owner of his Avon restaurant, Henry’s at the Barn, Jagielski also is the official food provider to the Cleveland Indians.

Long before the first fans bound through the gates, Jagielski heads to Jacobs Field to prepare a smorgasbord for the likes of Kenny Lofton, Victor Martinez and Grady Sizemore. After the team warms up with a little batting practice, they chow down on his carefully prepared meal.

But you can forget hot dogs, Cracker Jacks and beer. With so much riding on the game, Jagielski said he will fuel the team with high carb, low-fat foods.

“We want them up and running tomorrow (today). This stuff is easy to digest and will get them up and running,” he said, after sharing a bit of today’s menu. “They’re going to be eating this about 90 minutes before the game, so they need to be ready to win.”

Today’s menu — prepared to feed about 40 people, including players and coaching staff — will feature pasta, fresh fruits, vegetables, chicken and seafood. There will be no beef — it’s too heavy to digest on game day.

“They’re not high maintenance at all,” Jagielski said when asked about whether such a special game day would result in a lot of individual requests. “They happily eat what gets put in front of them. They just say ‘make it good.’ That’s all they care about.”
 

Contact Lisa Roberson at 653-6268 or lroberson@chroniclet.com.