September 30, 2014

Elyria
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CT speller clears third round in Washington, D.C.

Paul Kardar, 14 and an eighth-grader at Open Door Christian School, won The Chronicle-Telegram’s regional spelling bee in April. He’s now in Washington, D.C., where he will compete in the 83rd annual Scripps National Spelling Bee. Round 1 of the three-day competition begins tomorrow, but the Kardars have been in D.C. since Sunday. Paul will be updating us with his adventures throughout the week.

Paul Kardar looks up from his study materials for the upcoming National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., while in the courtyard outside Open Door. (CT photo by Bruce Bishop.)

Paul Kardar looks up from his study materials for the National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C., while in the courtyard outside Open Door. (CT photo by Bruce Bishop.)

Paul has made it through the third round, spelling ipecac correctly. (Ipecac, in case you were wondering, refers to a South American plant, its roots or drugs made from its roots.) Paul earlier made it through the second round by correctly spelling parvitude, which means likeness.

Here’s an update from Paul:

Wednesday

Today I took the round 1 test (a computer test composed of 50 questions, with 25 that count toward moving on). I could sound out almost all of the words, and I was familiar with about half of the words. I also went to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, one of two places where U.S. bills are produced. It was interesting to see how the bills we use today are produced. Another interesting place I went to was the National Archives. It was amazing to see the original Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other old U.S. documents, all written by our founding fathers, in person. The other site I went to was the Old Post Office. This post office has a clock tower that you can go up into and catch a good view; it is the 3rd tallest building in our nation’s capital.

Thursday

So far today, I spelled 1 word in the second round. It was a little bit nerve-racking waiting to find out if you will get a word that you know. I correctly spelled the word parvitude.