July 30, 2014

Elyria
Cloudy
66°F
test

Getting The Ball In The Air

A lot of golfers are under the impression that they need to help get the ball up in the air. In order to do this they usually hang back on the right leg and flip the club with excessive hand action through impact. While if timed perfectly this can create more height, this is a bad idea. When the weight stays back on the right leg the body isn’t able to pivot properly. This lack of pivot requires the hands to become too active too soon. The effect is the shaft leaning backwards at impact. This exposes too much bounce and the leading-edge gets too high off the ground. If the timings not perfect the leading-edge height causes us to hit thin shots.

Loft is actually just one component of getting the ball in the air.  In order to get the ball up high you need multiple factors, the main two being spin and speed.

First, spin is created by solid contact. The ball should be struck near the bottom of the club head in the center of the face. A slightly descending below should occur as well. Hitting down on the ball will help create spin. Think of the cue ball in pool. If you want the ball to spin back after it hits another ball, you hit the cue ball near the bottom with a descending angle. Hitting up on the cue ball above its equator will in turn impart forward spin. If the club head is hitting up on the ball you are losing the angle of attack. To create this same action in golf your hands should be ahead of the ball at impact. This creates forward shaft lean which in turn gets the leading edge underneath the golf ball and provides the slight descending blow necessary to create spin.

Another important component is speed. When you hang back on your right leg and release the club early to increase loft your losing your power accumulation prior to impact. This in turn leads to a slower club head that’s actually hitting up on the ball. The faster you swing the club the more spin you can create.

To encourage a descending blow do this drill: Take your normal address position. Relax your grip and turn the club face about 45 degrees closed so that the club points towards your left foot. Now taking your normal grip, make half swings attempting to hit the ball straight. To do this your hands will have to be considerably in front of the golf ball at impact