September 1, 2014

Elyria
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New Avon Lake drug, alcohol treatment center opens

Dan Haight, left, chief operating cfficer for Lorain County Alcohol and Drug Abuse Services, talks with counselors Deborah Broaddus and Tracy Hagedorn at the grand opening of The Wellness Clinic at 525 Avon-Belden Road in Avon Lake. STEVE MANHEIM/CHRONICLE

Dan Haight, left, chief operating cfficer for Lorain County Alcohol and Drug Abuse Services, talks with counselors Deborah Broaddus and Tracy Hagedorn at the grand opening of The Wellness Clinic at 525 Avon-Belden Road in Avon Lake. STEVE MANHEIM/CHRONICLE

AVON LAKE — The Lorain County Alcohol and Drug Abuse Services – Avon Lake Wellness Center officially opened to the public Thursday as part of a greater outreach in Lorain County.

LCADA, in partnership with the city of Avon Lake and the Avon Lake school district, unveiled its new location at 525 Avon-Belden Road during a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house Thursday.

Tracy Hagedorn, a senior professional in human resources at the center, said LCADA has a large presence in Elyria and Lorain, but expanding into Avon Lake will allow more residents to use LCADA’s services.

“We have a huge heroin problem in the county, and we’re hoping to continue to address that epidemic,” she said.

The Avon Lake Wellness Center will offer alcohol and drug treatment services, including group and individual therapy, and treatment services for adolescents, women and men. Mental health counseling is also available for adolescents at the clinic.

As well as prevention services, programming will be available to assist schools, parents and families to reduce the risk of alcohol and drug use among children and adolescents. Speakers will be available to provide presentations to schools, churches, clubs and civic organizations on topics related to alcohol and drug treatment, mental health counseling and healthy lifestyle choices.

A major focus at LCADA is the use of “care-vention,” a form of intervention that is more successful, according to Thomas Stuber, president and chief operating executive officer of LCADA.

Stuber, who has led LCADA since 1999, said intervention was popular in the 1970s, but care-vention was later adopted by counselors because the traditional approach was more confrontational.

By using the care-vention approach, families can help their loved ones fight an alcohol or drug addiction by taking a firm-but-loving approach.

“The care-vention really focuses in on the entire system,” Stuber said. “It really has to be done in a way where the whole team has to show that they care.”

Stuber said counselors at LCADA work with the family to set healthy boundaries and stop enabling behavior. A problem that many families face is that family members can be disjointed in their approach, he said.

Care-vention was discussed during a presentation after Thursday’s open house at the center.

Stuber said counselors are available at the Avon Lake Wellness Center should someone want to discuss care-vention.

He said it generally takes four to eight sessions to prepare groups for a care-vention.

The Avon Lake Wellness Center is open 8 a.m. until 9 p.m. during outpatient treatments and for appointments. The center accepts most insurance and Medicaid.

For more information, visit www.lcada.com or call (440) 989-5990.

Contact Chelsea Miller at 329-7123 or cmiller@chroniclet.com. Follow her on Twitter @ChelseaMillerCT.

  • Mike Litoris

    When Lorain has been running drug treatment centers for who knows HOW long, nobody bats an eye. When Avon Lake opens one, everyone loses their minds!

    • Jennifer Williams

      It is only because the people of Avon Lake think they are better then everyone else and finally they too can admit in their own neighborhood that they have these problems. Honestly most of the people I do know that have drug or alcohol problems come from Avon Lake and By Village areas. Guess they are not any better then those of us that live in cities such as Lorain or Elyria. My brother runs a Sober House in Elyria I know some of the guys that move into the houses and I was raised in Lagrange.

      • formerlorainresident

        I can assure you the residents of Avon Lake, Bay Village and other surrounding areas are acutely aware of the substance abuse issues in their towns. Many here have been actively involved in working both adults and children in these cities for years.

        When it comes to addiction, it is an equal opportunity disease It shows no bias in income, race or the size of your house.

        Before you lash out and stereotype “upscale” neighborhoods, I suggest you learn more about the people who live there. They are compassionate, charitable and give a lot to help others in their communities and others. You may have met some who don’t share these qualities, as you will in any town, but it is unfair to paint all residents with the same brush. If your experience is that they are all snobs, you have met the wrong ones, the same ones most in these towns try to avoid themselves.

        This is a welcome addition, we do need the help, as do all cities. Especially the youth, who are disproportionately impacted by this terrible disease.

        • formerlorainresident

          One last thing…..unlike many larger, inner-cities the community is very involved in these programs. When a forum is held at the high school, it is standing room only.

          We are fortunate enough to have involved parents, which I understand is not always the case in many cities. I think we can all agree this is critical to keeping our youth drug free and sober.

          Engaged parents, stable homes and proper education go a long way in reducing the problem.

        • Jennifer Williams

          Obviously you do not know who I am what I have been through. I have seen it all I was not stating any stereotypical nonsense. I was just clearly stating the JUNKIES my brother (who has been clean for 6 years now and runs a sobriety house) hung out with were from those areas. Right on the lake in Bay Village he OD’d in the house. But even after the other people (who introduced the heroin and coke to my brother) were told they too had problems they refused to believe so one. So I was YES stating from my own experience not to insult any suburbanites. Is that former Lorain currently Bay Village or Avon Lake? or Former Lorain County?

          • formerlorainresident

            Fair enough. I will tell you I have been to three funerals over the past 2 1/2 years for children of my friends in Avon Lake who died from alcohol/drug intoxication. They all played sports with my kids. I will also tell you I have 28 years of sobriety, so I have been there. I was a college educated professional when I ran into problems, so I know first hand it affects people of all classes and races.

            The truth is, many of the parents in town have issues, and their denial leads to their own children’s denial.

            While treatment centers are helpful, I really feel the best “therapy” is free, which comes through AA. It takes a willingness to assume responsibility and a desire to live a better life, which does not require a “formal” program to recover. There are many people who are willing to give their time to help, including myself. I have been a sponsor to many recovering people, adults and kids, taking those calls at 2am in the morning when someone needs help.

            I suppose this is why I get offended when I hear people in Avon Lake and towns like this think they are better than others. There are many, many people here just like me and I would be the same person regardless of where I lived.

            I grew up in South Lorain, so I know the problems certain neighborhood face. I knew I wanted out, not because I was pretentious or arrogant, but to create a better life for my family. I do think as a whole these type of towns offer that, but still are not immune from the problems every other city faces.

  • Mark B

    90% of those with a heroin addiction have no insurance or money to pay for treatment , and this should not be up to the tax payer or property owner to pay for .

    • Frank Sieminski

      what then just let them die maybe its a good idea for those who do want to change there lives then maybe you think? i think its alot better than having them out there robbing and stealing peoples homes and doing things that are illegal to support there habbit and it might save a couple lives instead of worrying about some stupid tax money were you have no clue were it actually goes how about get mad how the goverment and the cities spend the tax money on there own agenda would be the thing to do think its funny to see tax comments all the time like oh my god tax money doing this and that get a grip a human life is worth more than any amount of money you or i will ever make in are lifetime just think if it was your spouse son daughter or someone who needed this avenue to get this help your view would be very different then

      • Mark B

        How about people take responsibility for their own actions and not put the burden on someone else. Maybe you would like to donate half of your salary every week to support junkie rehab !

    • rightwingnutjobsareaproblem

      First off I’m going to assume you made that number up. Anyway, you obviously have no understanding and/or knowledge on addiction, whether it be drugs and/or alcohol. It’s a disease. Are you angry at people who have heart disease, cancer or other illnesses? The people suffering from those will raise your insurance rates! I’m being facetious. You should educate yourself on addiction before making ignorant comments on a topic you obviously don’t know much about.

      • Mark B

        But the people with heart disease most likely don’t blow all of there money / life savings getting high , have health insurance. a Junkie CHOOSE to have the so called Disease , the person with Heart Disease did not !

        • formerlorainresident

          I agree that all these people need to be held accountable, and their drug problems do not excuse their behaviors. They do have a debt to pay. If taxpayers pay for their treatment, they can mow the lawns, wash the cars and shovel the driveways of those who are too busy to do so because they are working to pay for others. This is not just for those with these types of problems, but anyone who lives off the taxpayers.

          As for the heart disease, I disagree on that one. Most is self-inflicted. Just go down to your neighborhood fast food restaurant and watch people stuffing their faces with garbage. Smoking is the number one cause of heart disease, these people have also made a decision which incurs a huge cost on society.

          My point is, I agree, all people should have to pay for their choices, but why limit it to those with drug problems? Obese smokers are also making a choice and one which is even more costly to society in terms of dollars spent.

        • rightwingnutjobsareaproblem

          I originally posted this towards another person’s comment, but it easily fits as a response to your’s as well. You obviously have no knowledge on the topic because it is considered a disease by medical professionals, which I’m assuming you are not. There are genetic traits in individuals that can make them more prone to addiction, just like any other disease. I’m not condoning using alcohol or other drugs, but it’s really not that different then someone with genetic traits of heart issues who does not take care of their health. You’re misconceptions and lack of knowledge on the topic is shared by many people. Like you, there are many Americans who think they know everything about everything, but just make themselves look stupid when making ignorant comments like yours. Try educating yourself on a topic before making public statements regarding things you have no knowledge of.

      • Bill Love

        Its not a disease it weak minded people that’s what’s wrong with American make excuse for there problems

        • rightwingnutjobsareaproblem

          You obviously have no knowledge on the topic because it is considered a disease by medical professionals, which I’m assuming you are not. There are genetic traits in individuals that can make them more prone to addiction, just like any other disease. I’m not condoning using alcohol or other drugs, but it’s really not that different then someone with genetic traits of heart issues who does not take care of their health. You’re misconceptions and lack of knowledge on the topic is shared by many people. Like you, there are many Americans who think they know everything about everything, but just make themselves look stupid when making ignorant comments like yours. Try educating yourself on a topic before making public statements regarding things you have no knowledge of.

    • formerlorainresident

      Says in the article they accept Medicaid. Though taxpayer funded, it is insurance.

      • formerlorainresident

        Really no different than Obamacare, which is also government subsidized healthcare. In fact, most of these Medicaid patients either have, or will, roll into Obamacare.

        The taxpayers will be paying for a lot more patients in the future, in additional to the traditional fee-for-service state run Medicaid patients we have been paying for in the past.

    • Tommy Peel

      90% ? where did you get that figure?

  • Mike Litoris

    If they de-criminalize drugs like meth and heroin, addicts may be less afraid to come out about their addictions and seek proper help.

  • Sharktooth Martin

    And now every health insurance policy covers rehab. About time. This is so long overdue.

    • formerlorainresident

      Under the Affordable Care Act, 40 million more Americans would be able to afford the $4,000 average monthly cost of treatment with the government subsidies. Government subsidies = taxpayer dollars.

      The thought is if you reduce dependency on drugs, the taxpayers will save money on prison costs. But with the centers being voluntary, I think this is just wishful thinking.

      One problem will be the drug addicts who will go to treatment at taxpayer expense only to avoid going to jail. Treatment in lieu of conviction. Many have no intention of stopping, but will use this as a means to “temporarily” stay out of jail.

      Finally, how many courses of treatment will be made available? The government has yet to clarify this. (One of those if you pass it, you get to read it statements, only now to find out there really is nothing in there that addresses this.)

      Can they go for 90 days as an inpatient, then a halfway house, then back for another 90 days? One could make a living out of this type of arrangement. There have to be some limits put on this. If you are unwilling to help yourself, why should other people be expected to pay your bills indefinitely. So should we give a person two chances, six chances, twelve chances, or unlimited opportunities at rehabilitation?

      You will see the number of “for profit” treatment centers explode over the next few months. It has become a lucrative venture; now that the government has placed it on the list of the ten essential services all insurance companies must offer. At this time, with no limits placed on the duration of therapy, or no standards of care requirements, I am sure there will be many entering this field for profit, not for the purpose of helping addicts and alcoholics live a sober life.

  • Sarah

    Wow. I am disgusted by all the comments of uneducated idiots. Alcoholism is a DISEASE. Yes they have a choice. As does everyone, but once one crosses that line of ADDICTION they need help, guidance, be taught the 12 steps of Alcoholism. Thank God for Avon Lake and LCADA. Way to go! Keep up the good work. I have the utmost respect for anyone trying to help. I am over 5 years sober, grew up in Avon Lake, went thru LCADA, and then even worked at LCADA. I think this is a great way to go to help every alcoholic. Thank God there is somewhere for us to go to get the help without insurance. I could’t be a happier mother of a teen in the Avon Lake High School. And all of you complaining about their tax dollars, just wait until you personally have an alcoholic in your family because they will rob and steal your life savings anyways. So be grateful their is help out there. This DISEASE affects all ages, mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts, uncles, sons, daughters, friends, etc. So be careful of how hypocritical you are.

  • thestingisthetruth

    Maybe open an incinerator for the heroin addicts, put them to use powering our homes.

  • Chris Heald

    More and more treatment centers can be opened. http://www.soberlivingoutpatient.com

  • http://www.spiritualriver.com/ Victoria – SpiritualRiver.com

    Lots of people are addicted to alcohol because currently it’s so easy to get stress: Paying monthly bills, 9-to-5 workweek, no time with family and so on. Alcohol will be the alternative choice to forget it. As a result, If it’s drunk regularly, then whatever problem may come, alcohol is the answer.