September 17, 2014

Elyria
Partly sunny
64°F
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LCCC pilots program for high school students

Larry Goodman, seated, chairman of the Board of Trustees at Lorain County Community College, signs for MyUniversity, a new program to accelerate college for high school students, at the LCCC board meeting Thursday. From left are Lorain Schools Superintendent Tom Tucker, Midview Schools Superintendent Scott Goggin, LCCC President Roy A. Church and Avon Lake Schools Superintendent Bob Scott. STEVE MANHEIM/CHRONICLE

Larry Goodman, seated, chairman of the Board of Trustees at Lorain County Community College, signs for MyUniversity, a new program to accelerate college for high school students, at the LCCC board meeting Thursday. From left are Lorain Schools Superintendent Tom Tucker, Midview Schools Superintendent Scott Goggin, LCCC President Roy A. Church and Avon Lake Schools Superintendent Bob Scott. STEVE MANHEIM/CHRONICLE

ELYRIA — Lorain County Community College is fighting back against a low college graduation rate with an ambitious program.

Thursday, college officials announced an initiative, MyUniversity, that attempts to make it easier for area high school students to complete college-level classes at their high schools. High school students can earn an associate’s degree through the college. Upon high school graduation, those students can transition to LCCC’s University Partnership program and earn a bachelor’s degree, some by age 20.

Tracy Green, vice president of strategic and institutional development, said MyUniversity will launch for the 2014-15 school year at Lorain, Midview and Avon Lake high schools. The intent is to have MyUniversity programs in every school in the county, but logistically a three-school pilot seemed best.

It will not replace current options, but will bring the Early College concept — now just available on the LCCC campus for students at Elyria and Lorain high schools — to the high schools. The college will make the program available at no cost to districts and the classes will be free to students, Green said.

“Early College is limited to 100 students. This opens the door for more students while allowing students to have that high school experience,” she said.

“This program removes the traditional boundaries to college access and has the potential to significantly increase the number of Lorain County students with a degree that will help them compete in the global economy,” said LCCC President Roy Church.

MyUniversity is LCCC’s answer to several concerns in the community — cost of college and time it takes to earn a degree — as well as its own less than 10 percent graduation rate, a number college officials said is misleading because it does not take into account the uniqueness of the school’s student population. The figure does not include the graduation rates of transfer or part-time students who make up the majority of LCCC’s student base.

“For students who want more from their high school experience and know they are going to college, this is a big deal,” Church said. “These pathways we have laid out are exactly what our students need.”

Nya Washington, 15, of Avon, is one such student. She, along with more than two dozen other students, was introduced to the board of trustees before the announcement of MyUniversity as examples of how dual enrollment works. The students articulated the struggles of working within the confines of current programs, like Post Secondary Enrollment Options, Titan College and Early College.

“I wanted to graduate with an associate’s degree, but couldn’t enroll in Early College unless I was an Elyria or Lorain student, so I opened enrolled into Lorain,” Washington said. Moments earlier, she spoke of the college-level research she was involved in with gene mutations that could inhibit HIV infections.

“This is a better atmosphere for me,” she said.

Taking college courses while in high school is nothing new in Lorain County. But the process was not always easy for some students, even for the most driven teenagers. PSEO and Advanced Placement courses are available at all area high schools.

In addition, students at Elyria and Lorain high schools have Early College High School as an option.

“We have been piecemealing this process when a clear pathway was needed all along,” Church said. “We’ve already had everything in place, but it’s time we spelled it out for students.”

Jordyn Stoll, 18, will graduate from Vermilion High School in the coming weeks and will have two honors associate degrees through LCCC. The work was done by taking every PSEO class she could as well as summer courses at the college.

“Basically, I had to figure it all out on my own to get me to this point,” she said. “I knew who to talk to at LCCC and they were great, but there was no map that said ‘do this and do that’.”

Stoll will transfer her credits to Cleveland State University in the fall.

“I knew I wanted to go to college and I figured out how to do it for less money,” she said.

She estimates she has saved at least $20,000. Stoll said she also worked with LCCC Professor Kathy Durhan on research examining how Lake Erie emits greenhouse gases.

In March, the big news at LCCC was a tuition guarantee for students registering in fall 2014 and spring 2015. The guarantee holds tuition and fee rates for up to three years or until the completion of a degree, whichever comes first.

This second promise takes the college’s pledge to help more students obtain their degrees further.

High school educators called MyUniversity the missing piece of the puzzle for linking secondary and post-secondary education.

“We were one of the first districts to add PSEO in the high school more than 20 years ago, but still not enough of our kids had access to college,” said Lorain Superintendent Tom Tucker. “This opens up the option and lets kids try college in a way that let’s them know they can do it — just taking one class or more right at their high school. It gets them on the road to a degree, and that is what we need in this economy.”

Contact Lisa Roberson at 329-7121 or lroberson@chroniclet.com. Follow her on Twitter @LisaRobersonCT.

MyUniversity

  • Students can earn an associate’s degree and high school diploma simultaneously, and have the flexibility to participate when they are ready
  • Students can earn a bachelor’s degree by age 20
  • MyUniversity can save students up to 80 percent of the cost of a bachelor’s degree
  • Includes onsite and ongoing academic career advising
  • Students get full high school experience and college experience
  • The degree pathways are business administration, computer science and engineering, psychology, education, biology, accounting and IT-computer information systems
  • MyUniversity is based on Titan College and the Early College High School program for Elyria and Lorain students


  • SniperFire

    This is just a press release, published in it’s entirety.

    ‘It will not replace current options, but will bring the Early College concept — now just available on the LCCC campus for students at Elyria and Lorain high schools — to the high schools. ‘

    If this is LCCC’s way of ‘fighting back’ on their admitted abysmal graduation rate, give us the numbers. What is the improved graduation rate currently experienced from Elyria / Lorain students using this program, which will now be expanded to other schools on the backs of the tuition rates of all students?

    What is the expected improvement in their 9% graduation rate once this program is implemented at the cost of higher tuitions and support from taxes of the homeowners?

    Is ANYONE accountable to the taxpayer? Does the 4th Estate exist anymore?
    Or do we just unquestionably accept propaganda from our institutions as long as we are provided with a staged cheesy signing ceremony photo op?

    • stop ur whining part deux

      You scream hatred for maintaining the status quo while at the same time criticizing any effort to improve. You are constantly beating the “personal responsibility drum” to death while suggesting it is LCCC’s fault that students do not complete their studies.

      HYPOCRITE.

      The real reason you are mad is because you thru away your chance at success. You are a bum that lives in your mothers basement and are just angry because you made terrible decisions. In fact, if i had to guess I would say that you are one of those kids that went to LCCC and failed out.

      • SniperFire

        ‘You scream hatred for maintaining the status quo ‘

        Stopped right there. Can’t get past the stupidity.

        • stop ur whining part deux

          You openly criticize LCCC for its poor grad rates and not doing enough to help students but as soon as they introduce a program to improve said rates you jump on that too.

          Again, you are a hypocrite wash out that can not hack the real world so you sit in moms basement and blame society for your lack of accomplishment.

          It’s lunch time, make sure mommy cuts the crust off the sandwich for you.

          Hahahaha, you are so incredibly sad and pathetic. I love it.

          • SniperFire

            ‘You openly criticize LCCC for … not doing enough to help students’

            Stopped right there. Too much stupidity. Ever hear of a strawman argument, troll?

          • stop ur whining part deux

            MOMMMMM…..MEATLOAF…..Hahaha. just go back to the XBOX little man. At least in that universe you are not an epic failure. bhabahahaha.

          • Bill Love

            can i ask you a question what would you do to make lccc better besides just bashing everything they do i agree they waste money and are killing the property owners with taxs but if your going to complain so much atleast come up with a idea to how they could improve the school

          • SniperFire

            ‘can i ask you a question what would you do to make lccc better ‘

            You would like to change the subject. I get that. But I will answer your question in the context of the issue at hand.

            I would have them prove that this program is going to be used to ‘fight back’ on their abysmal graduation rate, as claimed, and not just another burden being placed on the tuition of existing students who must take loans to pay for the handout to others.

            Accountablilty as the first step. Agreed?

          • Bill Love

            Agreed I wasnt changing the subject just see if u have a idea or jyst someone who does nothing but complain

          • Guest

            You don’t think accountability is a good idea, then, Bill?

          • Bill Love

            Yeah I said I agreed with him on that

          • Pablo Jones

            The best way for LCCC to increase the graduation rates would be to increase the standard for who they accept.

  • Sis Delish

    Seems a ploy to indoctrinate at earlier and earlier ages by the tenured radicals.

  • SniperFire

    ‘“This program removes the traditional boundaries to college access and has the potential to significantly increase the number of Lorain County students with a degree that will help them compete in the global economy,” said LCCC President Roy Church.’

    Should be easy to prove, then, Dr. Church. Potential to ‘significantly increase’ must be quantifiable in some way for you to make such a statement. Then these ‘significant increase’ can be measured against the cost. Is your assertion based on anything, or is it just meaningless feelgood babble?

  • Sis Delish

    Perhaps that $166k saved by new lighting had to be expensed, post haste?

  • Scout

    How about the fact that your taxes are going to pay for this? There are some students who can’t get into this program while in high school and may not be able to attend LCCC due to monetary concerns when they graduate high school. But the tax payer will end up paying for some else’s child to go to college even if their own child can’t …something is wrong here. I do support higher learning but I don’t support paying for another’s child to go when mine couldn’t afford it without getting major student loans.

    • SniperFire

      ‘ I do support higher learning but I don’t support paying for another’s child to go when mine couldn’t afford it without getting major student loans.’

      This is one of higher education’s dirty little secrets. Other students are paying the freight for handout programs by going into debt for the rest of their young lives. They are trapped in debt by people like Dr. Church.

      Everytime a golf scholarship is given, that raises the tuition and loan burden of another student, paid back in monthly installments for the next 20 years.

    • johns62

      PESO has been offered for a number of years. most earned credit hrs for classes they wont need to take again. Those who got a associates and graduated at the dame time should be applauded for using the education advantages available instead of complaining. Lack of a C average is the only way anyone is not eligible for PESO

    • Pablo Jones

      LCCC is hardly expensive when compared to other colleges and University. There are plenty of kids that have to work and pay their way through school on their own. If they can do it there is no excuse for why someone else can’t do it either.

      But as with all college, everyone needs to evaluate whether college is the right choice for them. Too many kids barely make it out of high school but go to college because they are told it will be in their best interest. Not everyone is cut out for college, especially if you barely make it out of high school.

  • Mark B

    Just a scam to get more money from property owners. I think LCCC Should be self sufficient and not get ANY handouts from our tax dollars.

  • Americaschild

    The education system has dumbed down to such a low that colleges have to take up the slack. Teachers Unions and their demands over education has destroyed schools. Elyria and Lorain schools stink and parents need to demand an education for their children. Show me a teachers strike in summer.

    • Pablo Jones

      If a kid or their parents want their kids to be educated they can get a very good education in public schools. The problem is it is the dumb ones that lower the average scores and get all the attention. New teachers, more money, new education plans aren’t going to make a difference for those kids. And that is fine, the world needs people to do manual labor and work for minimum wage. That is the choice that they and their parents made.

  • Americaschild

    What about kids who want shop class, cooking class, plumbing, welding, and hands out? Schools have eliminated all from their high school education and explect all to go to college and get in debt.

    • SniperFire

      Sorry, but those lifeskills don’t feed the higher education / lifetime debt requirements which our institutions are placing on the backs of our nation’s young people.

    • Scout

      Agreed and then we have people that have no skills to do the everyday jobs and all are beholden to the almighty government which holds them down..

    • Pablo Jones

      JVS?

  • SniperFire

    ‘ELYRIA — Lorain County Community College is fighting back against a low college graduation rate with an ambitious program.’

    Prove it. To date, their programs – which continue to expand rapidly – have garnered an abysmal 9% +/- rate. Why do we take their word for it this time?

  • SniperFire

    Here’s the thing. This particular program is grabbed onto by good students who will probably excel and get a 4 year degree. It may or may not be a good thing for the taxpayer to be funding. That is actually a different argument. The problem here is Dr. Church defends his abysmal graduation rate by claiming these students destined for 4 year degrees don’t figure into the numbers.

    So can we conclude Dr. Church is lying to the public by saying this program is his way to ‘fight back’ on his abysmal graduation rate, since he really does not plan to count these 4 year kids into his abysmal graduation rate, anyways?

    • The Thinker

      Is your reading comprehension really as bad as it seems or do see letters backwards when you don’t take your meds?

    • The Thinker

      Actually the most accurate comment made above is, “This particular program is grabbed onto by good students who will probably excel and get a 4 year degree. It may or may not be a good thing for the taxpayer to be funding. That is actually a different argument.” The rest is largely your usual, inflammatory, “I’m lonely so pay attention to me” ramblings.

      • SniperFire

        You’ll need to do better than the shallow thinking of ad hominen logical fallacy to hang with me. LOL