November 28, 2014

Elyria
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LCCC grads advised to work near home

Hayley Walther receives her Associate of Arts diploma from Lorain County Community College President Dr. Roy Church Saturday morning. ANNA NORRIS/CHRONICLE

Hayley Walther receives her Associate of Arts diploma from Lorain County Community College President Dr. Roy Church Saturday morning. ANNA NORRIS/CHRONICLE

ELYRIA — Before more than 1,300 graduates received diplomas and certificates from Lorain County Community College, college President Roy Church took Saturday’s commencement ceremony as an opportunity to remind the graduates to stay put.

Not stay in the same place in their college career.

But remain in Lorain County.

“I hope you’ll stick around to see what this place has to offer and better still, what you have to offer it,” he said.

Keynote speaker Robert W. Briggs, president of the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education, echoed the sentiment.

“If any of you are considering leaving Northeast Ohio for pastures that you think might be greener, I strongly urge you to reconsider,” he said. “Why? Because our region, Northeast Ohio, is experiencing the greatest economic and cultural renaissance since the beginning of the last century. Stay here, stay tuned and be a part of it.”

Briana Holland pumps her hands in the air as her name is called to receive her diploma from Lorain County Community College Saturday morning. ANNA NORRIS/CHRONICLE

Briana Holland pumps her hands in the air as her name is called to receive her diploma from Lorain County Community College Saturday morning. ANNA NORRIS/CHRONICLE

It has long been reported that Ohio suffers from a “brain drain” — young college-educated adults leave Ohio for job opportunities in other cities or states after graduating.

According to U.S. Census data released last year that examined population shifts in the state between 2010 and 2012, Ohio slowly is regaining its young-adult population. After years of sliding, there was a 2 percent population increase during that time.

“If you have a good sense of what you love to do and what you can be good at, you can generally find a role that someone is willing to pay you to do,” Church said. “With the skills and education you have accumulated here at Lorain County Community College, you are all prepared to get started. You may not qualify to be hired for the perfect job that you would love, but you can get started by taking the first related job for which someone is willing to pay you.”

Crystal Morgan, student senate president, wants nursing to be that path.

The mother of two, who completed the state nurse assistant program, is working toward her registered nurse certificate. She will join the college’s University Partnership program through the University of Akron to earn a bachelor’s degree in nursing.

She has promised her 16-year-old daughter, Jasmine, that in two years when the Early College High School student walks across the stage to receive her degree, Mom will be right there getting her four-year degree.

“I challenge each one of you to go fulfill promises within you, be a blessing serving the community and be steadfast in your life’s purpose by applying your skills that are continuously being perfected every day,” she said.

The graduates are ready to succeed. “I graduated from high school a year early in New York and then my family moved to Ohio,” said Emily Kiesel. “Jumping into college a year early in a new state was difficult for me. I had to learn to use the resources around me to succeed in a new environment.”

Kiesel earned an associate’s degree. She plans to transfer to Cleveland State University to complete a bachelor’s degree in mathematics with a minor in education.

Navy veteran Meletha Glover earned an associate’s degree in human resources management in 2013, a business administration degree in 2013 and Saturday walked away with a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Kent State University through LCCC’s University Partnership.

“My four years at LCCC and the University Partnership were positive and exciting,” she said. “The instructors were very knowledgeable in their field of studies and I learned a lot. The work was very challenging at times, but the reward in the end is worth it.”

Contact Lisa Roberson at 329-7121 or lroberson@chroniclet.com. Follow her on Twitter @LisaRobersonCT.


  • Sis Delish

    “According to U.S. Census data released last year that examined population shifts in the state between 2010 and 2012, Ohio slowly is regaining its young-adult population. After years of sliding, there was a 2 percent population increase during that time.”

    Translation: Basements around the region are filling up, not with storm water, but with recent grads as they move back home to play video games and drink beer.

  • SniperFire

    We’ll make Ohio a ‘right to work’ state in ’15, further accelerating Ohio’s comback!

    • mdr12372

      lol…min wage for all!

      • ClevelandBill

        Nobody works for minimum wage who hasn’t agreed to do so. Until people realize that the purpose of a business is to make a profit for its owners, and realize that their role is to advance that purpose by bringing talent, skill, and hard work to the job, these people will remain of low benefit to employers, and thus have completely earned their low wages. When they finally do realize their place in the economy, they break past minimum wage, becoming increasingly valuable to their employers, making their employer richer and themselves richer in the process. It starts with the employee these days … RISE UP, LEARN, PERFORM …

        • Scout

          Well said. However, if left up to the progressive movement all your points will be moot. More people need to speak out about personal responsibility and work ethics.

        • tickmeoff

          You have been reading too many business magazines. You are not living in reality. Like workplace democracy, it’s all talk, not reality!

          • ClevelandBill

            Then quit and start a business that works on your principles, that a business exists to give jobs to employees, that those jobs were created by Sherrod Brown and your Union Steward, and that the guy who owns your business has a bottomless well of cash to feed your disgusting greed–wanting something for nothing …

        • TruthWhisperer

          or if thats all the economy has to offer .

          Sucker

          • ClevelandBill

            We can all count how many TENS OF THOUSANDS of Lorain area folks CAME HERE FOR JOBS. From the hills of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Kentucky. From Puerto Rico. YOU KNOW, its possible to MOVE BACK OUT. There are better economies in this country, and those who can’t gain a foothold here (due either to the economy or their own personal failings) might find it elsewhere. (and my thought is that the same people who came here for Ford and US Steel are not necessarily the same people who ought to be moving out)

    • ClevelandBill

      Ohio becoming a right to work state would help our economy so much that even ignorant corrupt union bosses will benefit from the influx of income and wealth. Their union members still won’t benefit, they never do, but the bosses will be happy.

      • Simon Jester

        What about my right to fire employees that don’t meet my standards? How much of my time and money are they entitled to, once they’ve proven unwilling or incapable of doing the work??

        • ClevelandBill

          In my opinion? Zero. No time at all. The exceptions to that are contracted employees (like union employees). I hope the smart, truly profit-motivated employer will have some method to teach and warn and retain; because the person was good enough to hire, you should invest in keeping them. But sometimes we make mistakes in hiring, and they’ve got to go. As for contracted employees … don’t have them. Very few shops go union these days, mostly they’re inherited legacy old-school operations whose time is limited anyway … If an employer today were so awful that the workforce decided upon a union, the union is the least of your problems.

          • Simon Jester

            Wrong.

            Hiring mistakes happen, but If that person isn’t willing to put out, too bad. I’m not here to motivate the lazy or train the stupid. If one can’t swing it with the training all of their peers succeed with, I fire them. Unions can coddle all they want, since they don’t have the option of jettisoning dead weight. The amount of paperwork to actually fire someone is staggering. Hence why we try to weed out the useless first.

            If you disagree with that, thank the government. They’ve made it exponentially harder to even stay in business, much less work around useless employees.

    • tickmeoff

      Right to work is right to poverty. Move to North Carolina and work for low wages. No thank you. I called North Carolina, selling over the phone, we would stay in Minnesota,New York, Massachusetts for 45 minutes to an hour. North Carolina 5 to 10 minutes. Nice people, well mannered, but they don’t buy, because they simply don’t have the money.

      • Pablo Jones

        Right to work states as a whole have had a lower unemployment rate than non-RTW states for the last 30 straight years. Having a job puts you in a better financial position than not having a job.

        Maybe the people in North Carolina just don’t want what you are selling.

        • TruthWhisperer

          Right to work states also have the highest poverty rate the highest pregnancy rate and the highest dropout rate.

          Im sure your Wal-Mart job will be enough to sustain your 5 kids though

          Facts win every time

          • Pablo Jones

            You are right facts do win.

            1. Percentage Growth in Non-Farm Private Sector Employees (1995-2005)
            a. Right to Work States: 12.9%
            b. Non-right to Work States: 6.0%

            2. Average Poverty Rate-Adjusted for Cost of Living (2002-2004)
            a. Right to Work States: 8.5%
            b. Non-right to Work States: 10.1%

            3. Percentage Growth in Patents Annually Granted (1995-2005)
            a. Right to Work States: 33.0%
            b. Non-right to Work States: 11.0%

            4. Percentage Growth in Real Personal Income (1995-2005)
            a. Right to Work States: 26.0%
            b. Non-right to Work States: 19.0%

            5. Percentage Growth in Number of People Covered by Employment Based Private Health Insurance (1995-2005):
            a. Right to Work States: 8.5%
            b. Non-right to Work States: 0.7%

          • golfingirl

            Stop confusing Democrats with facts!

            It ruins a good “story.”

          • TruthWhisperer

            it is just a story, say when is the last time a Republican President left office with a balanced budget?

            I await your answer

          • Pablo Jones

            Again you have failed to list any facts. The fact is no US President has ever balanced a budget.

          • TruthWhisperer

            Yeah it was just Congress under Bill Clinton.

            Oh and that surplus also

            Lets not forget about the DJIA doubling under Obama and again under Clinton

            Whens the last time that happened under Republican control???

            I await your answer

            Facts caught you again :-)

          • Otter

            I’ll jump in here, No president has ever balanced the budget, because it is congress that balances the budget. As for Bill Clinton, the only time he had a balanced budget was when congress was under republican control, during his presidency…..

            Dat’s the fact’s Jack.

          • TruthWhisperer

            well? I await your answer sweet cheeks

          • TruthWhisperer

            haha you might want to get your ‘facts ‘ from an actual source

            Why are you lying?

          • TruthWhisperer

            Here let me clear up that confusion for you since you push out and right lies:

            The jobless rate in Oklahoma was below the national average for much of the 1990s, and, at 5.3% in October, is one of the lowest in the nation now. In addition to the right-to-work law, Oklahoma has introduced in recent years a set of incentives for businesses based on the number of jobs they created. And the expansion of two military bases lured aerospace companies, creating white-collar engineering jobs that put upward pressure on wages.

            “Given the context of our economic performance over the past several years, it’s difficult to say that right-to-work in any shape or form hampered us, which would lead you to believe it was a help,” said Deidre Myers, director of policy, research and economic analysis at the Oklahoma Department of Commerce.

            Case closed and you lose!

          • Pablo Jones

            What are my lies? The unemployment numbers for all states are available. The states that are RTW or Non-RTW are also available. Calculate the average unemployment for each group by year or by month. When you find one where the Non-RTW states are below the RTW states let me know.

          • Otter

            That’s the best you got? Mumbo jumbo “it’s difficult to say that right-to-work in any shape or form hampered us, which would lead you to believe it was a help.”

          • TruthWhisperer

            yeah right to work for minimum wage, dont you feel bad about your lies?

          • Pablo Jones

            Who earns minimum wage? The median household income is about $50,000. That means someone in that household is earning $25 / HR or if there are 2 full time workers they are earning $12.50 / HR.

          • Pablo Jones

            Here this chart will explain everything you need to know about low earners and high earners. Look at the average earners per household, marriage status, education. Minimum wage isn’t keeping them back, they are keeping themselves back through their life choices.

            http://www.aei-ideas.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Perry-incomeinequality.jpg

          • Starryeyes63

            well one you are not to bright to have 5 kids and expect to support working at Wal-Mart…. CROSS them legs……..

          • TruthWhisperer

            so you admit Wal-Mart employees don’t make enough to support a family

            Thanks for the clarification

          • Otter

            I would rather work for Wal-Mart, than as say, a telemarketer…..

          • Starryeyes63

            Well it don’t take a brain surgeon to work there. Minimum skills + minimum education = minimum wage. You want higher wages do something about it. We worked for my high wages & retired at 45 & 47.

          • Pablo Jones

            The clarification would be that a single parent household can’t support a family of 6. Two parents working at Walmart could support a family of 7. They would be right at the poverty level. That is with them only working 30 hours a week. If they work full time they would be above the poverty level. A single parent could support 2 kids working at Walmart.

            And here is the kicker, the average walmart employee makes more than a person working at unionized Kroger or Target.

        • tickmeoff

          No. They want what I am selling, they simply cannot afford to live properly. I vacation there. It’s a pretty state. I believe you are counting on not having to work for it.
          I have worked non-union most of my life, but to believe that policy doesn’t hurt the people on the bottom is denying reality. A decent company in this day and time will be able to have a non-union environment.
          What you are proposing was tried before people had a chance to unionize. It was slavery. Company town, company script( That’s money), and company stores.
          Around here, you work overtime or hold a second job, because the first job doesn’t pay a working wage. Your proposal will make it more common that people will have to live like the people in North Carolina. Welcome to the trailer life!

          • Otter

            Huh? I have apparently lost some serious IQ points reading the CT because I don’t understand ….Company town, company stores? It’s 2014, not 1914….what are people not counting on working for? A decent company will be able to have a non union environment, But before unions it was slavery? They want what you’re selling but can’t afford to live “properly”? Sorry, but it appears to me you have gone a bit off script.

          • Pablo Jones

            And what is it that you are selling? Maybe I want to buy it. But if you are telling the people they can’t afford to live properly maybe that is why they aren’t buy, they just don’t like you.

            I’m not sure what you are referring to about counting on not having to pay for it. Because I’m not unionize I have made more money every year that I have worked. I have gotten raises when others in my company have not. Because I create value from my work. I have worked in unionized environments, you know what it creates? Lazy people. People that get paid the same amount of money regardless if they are good workers or poor workers. And the good hard working employees quickly realize there is nothing to gain from working hard when they make the same amount of money as the person who doesn’t do anything.

            FYI 2.5%. That is the percentage of the working population that earns minimum wage or less. The majority of those however earn tips which pushes their wages above minimum wage.

          • TruthWhisperer

            really 2.5% of US citizens are on minimum wage?
            Stretching the lies a bit aren’t we?

          • Pablo Jones

            142 million people employed in 2012. Of those 1.6 million earn minimum wage and 2 million earned less (tip workers). You do the math and let me know if I am stretching things? You can get all the info from BLS.gov.

            Where are you getting your info that you are using?

      • Otter

        So you are one of those pests that calls people on the phone?

        • tickmeoff

          At least I am working for more than minimum wage!

          • Pablo Jones

            Along with the other 97.5% of the country. That is like bragging that you are taller than 3 foot.

          • tickmeoff

            Have a good evening Intelligent Donkey!

          • Otter

            Well good for you, as long as you are working for a legit telemarketing company, and not one of the many who are out to scam people…..

  • Phil Blank

    No one that has a job offer somewhere else is going to “stick around”, they will take the job no matter where it is.

  • Otter

    Maybe some of them could get jobs cutting the grass around LCCC…..

    • pass the pepper

      LCCC does employ it’s grads when they cannot find work (part-time so there is no need to offer benefits), and Career Services posts all sorts of great jobs–like pizza deliverer. That way, the Administration can declare LCCC grads are highly employable and thus attempt to justify their fat salaries and great benefit and retirement plans. Works out for everyone; just some better than others.

      • Otter

        I’m just saying, someone needs to maintain the grounds, and the roads…the whole place looks like crap.

  • Simon Jester

    Arts = “Would you like fries with that?”

  • John Davidson

    “Why? Because our region, Northeast Ohio, is experiencing the greatest
    economic and cultural renaissance since the beginning of the last
    century. Please make note this is happening with a Republican Governor.

  • Take it down a peg

    Oh…for crying out loud…go where the job is…screw Lorain County..screw anyone that tells you “Oh come on…things are gonna be great!”

    Remember, it’s the business of the politician and local media to pump up their region and to not allow anyone to point out anything bad

    If Ohio and Lorain County want to keep them…they need to allow attract the business…and THAT means creating a region that businesses would actually want to do business (which means making decisions with the long term, not short term, in mind)

    • SniperFire

      ‘and THAT means creating a region that businesses would actually want to do business ‘

      I chuckled when I read Matt Lundey attacking his opponent for County Commission as being ‘pro-corporate.’ Leftist idiots wonder why place like Elyria and Lorain are dying dependency sheetholes while the rest of Ohio is thriving once again.

  • Bubba1

    I thought Kasich said Ohio is booming. Anybody can find a job, just look for it,the minimum wage may come up thanks to the job the gov. is doing bringing in all these jobs.

  • luvmytoaster

    When I lived in Elyria I was one of the “lucky” ones to find a job in the town that I lived in. My husband wasn’t so lucky and therefore we had to pay tax to the city that he worked in and another “partial” tax to Elyria.
    As far as Elyria goes, there just aren’t enough jobs to keep local graduates working in the city – you have to go where the jobs are.

  • SniperFire

    Wonder when the C-T will do their next free campaign ad for Mat Lundy, who is a self proclaimed hater of corporations which would be the ones who bring jobs that Dr. Church wants? Or is talking out of both sides of the mouth just what the left does?

    • golfingirl

      You mean “door mat” Lundy?

  • Bubba1

    Good thing their building a new taco bell in lorain. Kasich can chalk up another 2 dozen jobs to his resume. You go Gov. you’re the greatest.

  • Pablo Jones

    College grads, review this chart below and make the correct choices and you will have a better chance for a successful life.

    http://www.aei-ideas.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Perry-incomeinequality.jpg