November 22, 2014

Elyria
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Elyria students tend the seeds of kindness

Prospect Elementary School second-grader Regan Brillhard, 8, delivers a geranium and a kindness card with her friend, fourth-grader Emily Connell, 10, on Friday afternoon. KRISTIN BAUER/CHRONICLE

Prospect Elementary School second-grader Regan Brillhard, 8, delivers a geranium and a kindness card with her friend, fourth-grader Emily Connell, 10, on Friday afternoon. KRISTIN BAUER/CHRONICLE

ELYRIA — An infectious spirit of kindness took root Friday afternoon in the neighborhood around Prospect Elementary School.

It was like the young students were gardeners of goodwill. Armed with potted geraniums, they walked down nearby streets and left young buds on the doorstops of every home.

A little note was attached to each plant. It read, “An act of kindness for you from Prospect Elementary.”

Little 8-year-old Sarah Morrison held her plant steady with two hands as she approached a home on Illinois Circle. The second-grader gently placed the flower near the front and smiled. How does this make you feel, asked her teacher.

“It was really nice, I think,” she said.

Almost 500 flowers went out in the neighborhood.

Besides Prospect, every elementary building in the district had students out this week handing out flowers. The Kids for Kindness project was funded through a grant from the Elyria City Schools’ Endowment Fund based on a grant proposal written by the elementary school counselors.

“Students also read ‘Glenna’s Seeds,’ which told a story about how one act of kindness started a chain reaction of good deeds. It talked about passing on kindness and how it can change a neighborhood or a school,” said Michele Mariotti, a guidance counselor. “We told the students it’s easy for them to go out in their neighborhoods and start a chain reaction of kindness.”

Kindness is, or at least should be, contagious, said 11-year-old CJ Cummings.

“If someone does something nice for you, you should do something nice for them,” he said.

Angela Lee, also 11, said the flowers could do good things in the neighborhood.

“They can start like a chain reaction of kindness,” said the fifth-grader.

Contact Lisa Roberson at 329-7121 or lroberson@chroniclet.com. Follow her on Twitter @LisaRobersonCT.


  • tickmeoff

    What a sweet story!

  • ched

    I received one of these Plants on Friday. I saw them walking around at lunch, and when I got back home from work, I had one on my front porch. This is Wonderful!