October 21, 2014

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Cedar Point to mark anniversaries of four signature attractions

The Blue Streak, Cedar Point’s oldest roller coaster, will observe its 50th anniversary this year. CHRONICLE FILE PHOTO

The Blue Streak, Cedar Point’s oldest roller coaster, will observe its 50th anniversary this year. CHRONICLE FILE PHOTO

They’ll be serving up cupcakes and cake at Cedar Point during this weekend’s big anniversary of four of the park’s signature roller coasters.

Word to the wise: you might want to ride first and eat later.

The park’s oldest coaster, the wooden Blue Streak, will observe its 50th anniversary.

Opened in 1964, the 78-foot-tall ride is off the park’s main midway where it treats riders to a top speed of 40 mph during a one-minute-and-45-second trip along its classic out-and-back track.

“Blue Streak is a coming-of-age coaster,” Cedar Point spokesman Bryan Edwards said. “For many families it was their first ride, and the first coaster you rode when you hit that height requirement.”

The ride is near the Raptor, among the world’s first inverted steel roller coasters on which riders are suspended in seats below the track.

The green-and-purple Raptor will be celebrating its 20th anniversary, having debuted in 1994.

When it opened, Raptor was the tallest (137 feet), longest (3,790 feet) and fastest (57 mph) inverted coaster in the world.

Park official also will honor the Cedar Creek Mine Ride, which observes its 45th year in Frontiertown. Opened in 1969, the ride has hosted more than 61 million passengers.

While Blue Streak and the Cedar Creek Mine Ride require regular maintenance and replacement of wood, there has never been any significant talk of removing or relocating either one to make way for something bigger, faster or costlier, Edwards said.

“They’re as Cedar Point as Cedar Point gets,” Edwards said.

The Mine Ride gave more than 2 million rides in the late 1970s, Edwards said. Today, the ride is still carrying 700,000 to 800,000 riders per season.

The Magnum XL-200, which remains one of the park’s best-known and biggest roller coasters, will celebrate its 25th anniversary.

Opened in 1989 at an estimated cost of $8 million, the 205-foot-tall, 5,106-foot-long steel coaster shattered records for height (first to exceed 200 feet), and speed (72 mph).

The still-popular ride gives between 1.6 million to 1.8 million rides a year, according to Edwards, and ranks behind only Millennium Force, Top Thrill Dragster and Gatekeeper, the 67-mph, winged coaster that seats riders on either side of the track, which opened in 2013.

The park also will give a nod to its Camp Snoopy kids’ area, which is 15 years old this season.

The anniversary weekend will be marked by a 10:30 a.m. ceremony Saturday in the Blue Streak Plaza, where guests can enjoy free cupcakes and cake.

Free 50th anniversary Blue Streak T-shirts and drink tumblers also will be given away while supplies last.

The first 500 riders on each roller coaster marking an anniversary also will receive a limited-edition souvenir pin commemorating that particular ride. The pin giveaway begins at 11 a.m. at the exit of each ride.

Contact Steve Fogarty at 329-7146 or sfogarty@chroniclet.com.


  • Phil Blank

    No way.
    1. its too old.
    2. On a different coaster, I was scared to death riding as kid and I’ve not been on a coaster since. Mom kept tellimg me “you’re gonna fall out”, “you’re gonna fall out”.
    She was joking of course, but at a young age, I believed her.

    • Pablo Jones

      Back then with a single lap bar and seat belt for both passengers, if you were small and your co-rider was large you had to hold on with hands and legs. There wasn’t much else holding you in.

      • http://comradealan.com/ Alan Pugh

        Blue Streak and Mine Ride are still just a lap bar and seat belt, as are a few other older ones. Corkscrew was one of the first coasters with a harness (1976), but it also inverts three times.

        When it comes to restraints, Millennium Force and Top Thrill Dragster’s t-bars feel like nothing’s holding you in your seat. It’s the best part of the ride on each.

    • HankKwah

      I rode the Blue Streak with my younger cousin YEARS ago. He wanted to keep the belt loose, so I let him. As we soared over the second hill, I looked to see how he was doing and he was a foot-plus above the seat. I hauled him back in and cinched the belt tight. Really looked like I was going to lose him, but he was loving it.