October 20, 2014

Elyria
Rain
52°F
test

Positive evaluations lead to raises for Midview administrators

Scott Goggin

Scott Goggin

Nicole Spriggs

Nicole Spriggs

GRAFTON — Midview school board members are expected to give both Superintendent Scott Goggin and Treasurer Nicole Spriggs a modest pay increase following favorable evaluations of both administrators.

Spriggs and Goggin are to receive increases of $3,000 a year in base pay, effective Aug. 1. Both will assume increases in health care contributions, which will bring them in line with changes made to all of the other employee groups.

The evaluations and proposed contract amendments for both will be discussed at a school board meeting at 6:30 p.m. today. Other proposed changes for Spriggs include the addition of an educational allowance of $3,000 a year, vacation time set to 25 days a year and severance pay, if needed, set to 85 days.

Spriggs said when she was hired in 2012, she was completing her master’s degree and tuition reimbursement was not included in the contract. The allowance will cover any future classes or continuing education courses.

In the evaluations, the board looked at how well Goggin and Spriggs performed their jobs for the 2013-14 school year. It was Goggin’s first year on the job and Spriggs’ second as treasurer.

The evaluations were done in executive session on July 23.

Goggin was lauded for his efforts to work with teachers and staff as well as his openness with board members, community members, parents and students.

“Scott focuses on the staff and getting to know them, which helps with determining their strengths and weaknesses and knowing which position someone would be good in,” according to the summary of his evaluation. “Even the students from the school district know who the superintendent is.”

The summary touched on how Goggin has reorganized the schools, which led to North and West elementary schools combining as kindergarten through fourth-grade buildings, his involvement with negotiations with both the Midview Education Association and Ohio Association of Public School Employees that were completed without legal representation and his plans to improve tests scores in the district.

“Scott is working with the staff on focusing on a growth mindset instead of a fixed mindset,” the summary said. “Scott is focused on continuing the building of the school district and to align the goals of the school district with the staff for everyone to have a sense of ownership.”

The summary did not articulate any areas of growth for the superintendent.

“The Board appreciates the dedication that Mrs. Spriggs has to her position, but the Board would like her to enjoy more of her weekends,” the summary said.

Like Goggins, Spriggs was lauded for her work on the collective bargaining agreements, including changes to the district’s health care policies. Spriggs said single employee plans will save $900 a year and family plans will save the district $3,000 a year.

The board said Spriggs works well with her staff.

Contact Lisa Roberson at 329-7121 or lroberson@chroniclet.com. Follow her on Twitter @LisaRobersonCT.


  • bigmacky

    wow 25 days vacation and 85 days severance – very nice – now DONT ASK FOR ANOTHER LEVY until you can figure out how to stop wasting money

  • Summer Smart

    Nice to know where the extra $50 a month on my house payment is going….

    • Melanie Lovell Innes

      not to mention, there are bullies among them.

  • luvmytoaster

    OMG, “The Board appreciates the dedication that Mrs. Spriggs has to her position, but the Board would like her to enjoy more of her weekends,” the summary said….

    How is this at all relevant to her job? I can’t imagine what work she has to do on the weekends that affects her day to day performance as a Treasurer for crying out loud, but how does the BOE know about it?

  • golfingirl

    My guess is both make approximately $100k per year.

    The increase, 3%, is “modest” only because they are already overpaid.

    Next time they request a “modest” levy increase….just say no!

    • Summer Smart

      we already did that and they went behind our backs and screwed us anyways.

  • Sis Delish

    Its becoming clearer by the year the overall objective of all Educators is to have as much time AWAY from the job of educating as allowed by their handlers.

    Teachers/Professors/Administrator have never evolved from having Summer Vacation, Christmas Vacation, Spring Break, Federal Holidays and Snow Days off. Only difference between when they were Young and today is they Get Paid for the down-time!

    • VarsityGold

      The pay in the Summer time is their salary earned while in the classroom spread out. I guess they could just take their salaries and combine it into 18 pay checks and no one can complain about getting paid in the Summer. The “Getting paid in the Summer without working” comment doesn’t make sense.

      • Sis Delish

        Last time I checked, Students don’t get paid for Summer Vacation, Christmas Vacation, Spring Break, Federal Holidays and Snow Days off.

        Nice Try at Justification, however.

        • VarsityGold

          My point is people say ” Teachers get paid in the Summer for doing nothing”. That is not true. The money they get paid in the Summer is earned during their time in the classroom. Simple to understand I thought.

          • Sis Delish

            My Original Point clearly stated: “Only difference between when they were Young…”

            You clearly missed the comparison. Nice try.

            BTW, show me another CEO of an organization with 100 or more employees who takes that many days off.

          • VarsityGold

            School district tells teacher we will pay you $50,000 to educate our kids. School district takes the $50,000 and divides it by 24. Therefore in June, July and August they will get a paycheck twice a month for $2,083. Districts could cut them 18 checks for $2777.77 for the other 9 months so people can’t say they do nothing in the Summer and get paid. When they were young, they weren’t teaching, they were in the classroom. So there is no comparison.

          • Sis Delish

            My Point is that they haven’t grown up and the only difference between then and now is they get Paid to take the summer off, regardless of how its divvied-up!

          • VarsityGold

            But they have degrees, most have families, mentor kids, are responsible but yet they haven’t grown up? That’s all I needed to know about you and where you are coming from. Good day!

          • michelle

            It’s like talking to a wall, isn’t it.

          • luvmytoaster

            And at the same time they are free to seek other part-time employment during the summer

          • 2Cents

            Barack Obama ! (couldn’t resist)

          • VarsityGold

            lol

          • luvmytoaster

            But they are getting paid for 12 months of work and only working 9 months out of the year.

          • VarsityGold

            They are getting paid for 9 months of work, spread out over 12 months of pay. See post below.

          • The Great One

            Then they shouldn’t get paid as much over the year. Instead of $60,000/year how about 40,000/year since they only work for 9.5 months. Work 12 months to get paid for 12 months.

          • Pablo Jones

            No just over paid for the 9 months. They spread it out because they know some people are bad with money and would blow it and be broke during the summer. Also it is a way for the unions to keep getting their dues all summer long.

          • Bill Love

            teachers have 2 options when they get hired in they can collected salaries for 9 months or 12 most teachers having spread out throughout the whole year

          • Pablo Jones

            I agree it is pay spread over the full year. But that really isn’t a very compelling point to make, because that says the teachers get paid about $60,000 for roughly 200 days of work. Then if they decide to teach during the summer they get additional pay for that.

          • VarsityGold

            Very true Pablo, but I’m keeping it simple for those who make the comment without thinking about what is actually happening.

          • Sis Delish

            Actually, I’d prefer to refer to you as JVGold.

          • VarsityGold

            ok

  • copperbill

    $ 138,000 before raise for Mr. Goggin…

  • copperbill

    http://www.teachersalaryinfo.com/ohio/teacher-salary-in-midview-local/ Go here for great Midview school information and salaries etc.. eyeopener….

    • VarsityGold

      Compare those salaries with those in the other occupations with the same amount of education and years of experience.

      • Pablo Jones

        Compare the education of kids 50 years ago (what they learned and were able to do) with kids today. (There isn’t much difference) Now compare how much was spent on kids back then compared to now, even adjusted for inflation. (big difference) Apparently more money, technology, teachers with masters, etc. doesn’t improve education.

        • VarsityGold

          How many kids 50 years ago left early for the many manufacturing jobs that were available? I have many friends and relatives that are older than me without HS diplomas that made a good living with those jobs and have since retired. There are kids ink todays HS’s that wouldn’t be in HS 50 years ago. This could derail the whole thread, but compare the family dynamic as well. The US education system isn’t perfect, but they do try to educate every citizen. Many countries track kids into vocational jobs very early, I don’t think we do (We should start because it’s a lost art among the younger generation).

          • Pablo Jones

            How many graduated in 1940 it was roughly 50%. In 1960 it was roughly 65%. In 1970 it peaked at 77% before falling back to 69% in 2007. It has improved a little and is around 74% now. So I should have said 40 years ago vs. 50. But in any case the percentages are pretty close. So how many are in school now that wouldn’t have been in school 40-50 years ago? Not much more.

            Test scores SAT and High school test scores NAEB (I think is the group that tracks out going high schoolers) have shown test scores have dropped since the early 70′s. So even with teachers that have their master’s degree, computers, testing, and new teaching methods we are regressing on education instead of progressing.

            I agree trades should be pushed. College isn’t for everyone and people can make good money if they learn a trade. Too many kids get pushed into college and drop out.

            Ideally you would have different HS diplomas, one for an academic track (AP and college prep classes), one for trades (HS basics with a specialty in X trade), and one general diploma. It would allow those that applied themselves to standout from the rest. It also brings home the reality that just because you graduated HS doesn’t mean you are necessarily ready for college.

          • VarsityGold

            I also think Pablo, that more and more kids take the ACT than they did years ago. Kids are even encouraged to try it when they are in 9th and 10 grade to try and improve scores later. Back then, the true college level kids were the only ones taking the ACT compared to today. Years ago, kids weren’t coming out of HS with the college credits they come out with today taking AP and PSEO classes. Good conversation. Thank you!

          • Pablo Jones

            True kids in the 70′s taking the test were more likely to be just those that did well in school and were going to college. But many back then only took the test once and did no prepping. Today kids take the test multiple times and improve their scores (the comparison was for juniors and senior scores, so taking them in 9th & 10th wouldn’t lower the average). Like you said kids today are also taking AP and advanced classes that should improve their scores. Further there is a world of information now on how to take the tests and improve your score even if you don’t really know the answers.

            Then we have the high school scores that are taken for everyone regardless if they go to college. They have not changed much since the early 70′s.

            http://educationbythenumbers.org/content/high-school-test-scores-havent-improved-for-40-years-top-students-stagnating_251/

            Which makes me wonder if we stuck with what was working back then and maybe expanding it (more individual attention to those that need it) how much better off would we (kids) be now.

        • Bill Love

          And back then parents actually helpes there kids learn now most parents just let the teacher do everything then wounder why there kid is falling behind

          • Pablo Jones

            Any study that shows that or is that just what you believe?

            A student in 1950 had about 25% chance that their parents graduated high school it might be a stretch to say they were teaching their kids. There are also several polls of parents asking if they are more involved with their kids school than their parents were involved in their schooling. Overwhelmingly parents say they are more involved now than their parents were. On the shorter time frame other studies show parents are more involved now than they were just 15 years ago.

            http://www.childtrends.org/?indicators=parental-involvement-in-schools

          • Bill Love

            Then why do 60% of kindergarten s do. No there abc or basic things when they start sxhool

          • Pablo Jones

            Did more kindergartners know their ABCs, how to count, and their shapes in the past? 30 years ago only 5% of starting 1st graders could do basic reading. Now it is significantly higher with some areas having over 80% doing basic reading starting first grade.

            The simple answer for why many kindergartners don’t know much is because they are 4&5 years old. They will do better in life playing at that young age and using their imagination.

            Test scores are not everything. In college I knew many kids from other countries that were raised with the importance of education thrust on them at an early age. They were like little human calculators able to solve almost any type of problem involving math. The problem was even though they could get the answer, their mind was so limited they could never grasp the meaning behind what they were doing. Thinking outside the box or finding alternative ways to solve problems is as difficult for them to do as differential equations are for most people.

            Our free thinking and creativity is what keeps us ahead in the world and if we try to emulate those other countries we will lose our edge and fall behind them. Because no matter what we do we will never be able to turn even 20% of our kids into human calculators.

      • Joe Smith

        Compare the amount of work days per year while you are at it.

        • Bill Love

          and a lot of teachers are still in the classrooms all summer long doing different things for the following year

          • Pablo Jones

            No they are not. They do some stuff here and there, but not full days or a full week. They have 180 days of school, round up to 200 more than covers what they do during the Summer.

          • Bill Love

            Yeah they do I have seen them.also they take different class and course threw out summer too. Plua the 180 days of school dont count foe the in service days parnet teacher conferences or after school meeting or them staying late for work or grading papers at home or meeting little johns parents when its convenient for them

          • Pablo Jones

            Well living across from a school, knowing teachers, and having a family member that was a teacher, the amount of work they say they do over the Summer is vastly over stated.
            During in service days at the school, if the teachers show up (often the schools are empty) they are only there for a short period of time if they have meetings. Teachers only start showing up to school about a week or 2 (never full days) before classes start and they are not there for a full day. At the end of school they are only there for about a week (again never a full day).

            Most professionals have to take continuing education classes to keep up with their license. It is what they have to do to be licensed. Most do it on their own time with their own money.

            As far as work day again many professionals that are paid a salary work more than 40 hours a week. In Ohio schools are required to teach at a minimum of 910 hours of instructional time. At 8 hour days that is less than 115 work days. Most schools are in roughly 6-6.5 hours with about 5.5 hours of instructional time. If they grade papers at home or meet parents after school they still have plenty of time before they close their 40 hour work week.

          • VarsityGold

            It doesn’t matter what they do in the Summer. The contract they sign is for the days they are educating kids plus a couple more. It just gets distributed in the throughout the year (Summer included). It’s wrong to say teachers get paid for doing nothing in the Summer. That money is earned during the school year. Anyone who has a job on Salary can tell you that.

          • Pablo Jones

            Again I’m not disagreeing. Bill was justifying by talking about all the extras they may do during the Summer.

            I have an issue when people say they are under paid for all the work they do. Like you said they get paid for 9 months of work and then have the Summer off. But when those that say teachers are underpaid hear people say they have Summers off they get upset and start saying everything they do during the Summer to justify why they should make more.

            Teachers make on average $60,000 + benefits in Ohio for 9 months of work. They make in 9 months what people with similar degrees make in a full year. They are not underpaid.

          • The Great One

            Then maybe whoever draws up the contract should offer about 10-20% less pay

          • John Davidson

            Then the unions will be picketing.

          • Bill Love

            Well I see alot if teacher going the extra mile for there students I know not all but there are some good ones out there

          • Joe Smith

            Like most of us who do some work in the eve and on weekends and don’t get paid extra but they are not required to do so and could just stay home if they chose.

          • Bill Love

            Hey I have to work in the evening s sometimes too and im always bring prints home to look over I dont get paid for stuff I bring home frm job either I do get overtime if I work weekends. I bwt alot do stay home but there are some good teachers who go the extra mile is all im saying.

          • Joe Smith

            Yes they are some good teachers, that was not the point, but this would be a good reason that teachers should get more pay based on merit, not just because they are in a union.

          • Bill Love

            The funny part the people that got the raises are not teachers

  • Joe Flabetz

    Taxpayers get duped again. No mention of raises for administrators during levy campaign. Remember it’s all about the kids?

  • VarsityGold

    What would a CEO in charge of a few hundred employees and a multi-million dollar budget make a year?

    • Sis Delish

      I don’t know, please tell us.

      And, in Your Answer, please provide information as to whether said CEO led a company with Profits or Losses on a regular basis.

      • VarsityGold

        I asked the question, therefore I don’t know the answer. It wasn’t rhetorical.

        • Sis Delish

          Some CEO’s who are in the stated position take an annual compensation of either $1.00 or Zero Dollars.

          Know why? Because they want the Company to succeed and be profitable. They’ll defer compensation until when it is available, rather than putting their companies in perpetual deficit positions. (If they want to keep their jobs and companies viable, that is. Some even negotiate compensation based on the promise of performing well in the form of Stock Options.)

          Compare that to these educators who cannot live without some Cost-of-Living adjustments on the back of Taxpayers who, as the above example points out, may be CEO’s who refuse to drain their companies of much needed cash.

          • VarsityGold

            Educators don’t produce a product that sells for a profit. If someone that is educated and has a very big responsibility, they should be compensated. Especially if they are performing well.

          • Pablo Jones

            They do. They produce educated young adults. People or businesses buy them (their labor or skills for a wage) and the work they do produces a profit. If the quality of product (the students) they produce can’t perform basic tasks they fail.

            We always here educators are all about the students and that there is never enough money to teach them. But when extra money comes in (or even when it doesn’t) the teachers still demand more money. If they don’t take the pay increase there would be more money for the kids.

          • John Davidson

            Yes they do. Students have to sell themselves to employers and colleges. And myself having been an employer they better start teaching their students how to make a good impression.

          • 2Cents

            Hear, hear!

    • Pablo Jones

      The average CEO earns less than $400,000. A CEO of a company that has $1 Billion in revenue has a compensation package of about $1.7 million. Up to $10 million in revenue would be compensated roughly $200,000. That includes health insurances, retirement, etc.

      http://chiefexecutive.net/how-much-does-the-average-ceo-really-earn

      • VarsityGold

        I’m asking out of ignorance and with a respectful tone. Does that include stock and other ways they can get paid?

        • Pablo Jones

          That is their average compensation package. Some could be paid a straight wage, others a low salary but high stock package, or other means of compensation (drivers, cars, corporate plane use, etc.) The news reports of the average CEOs making $10+ million a year are usually the average of the top 10 largest companies in the US.

  • 2Cents

    For those who live in the Midview district, I would suggest you contact the “board” members who evaluated Spriggs and Goggin. Let them know how you feel about the proposed raises and revisions to their contracts. Go to the website and contact them NOW: http://www.midviewk12.org/BoardofEducation.aspx

    Meeting is at 6:30 so get in your car and go. As a taxpayer, you have the right to a voice in this, they are suppose to represent you. Give the board members a “modest” kick in the butt. Remember, they are ELECTED by you!

  • Jim

    Its real simple, if u live in the district and don’t like it, move out.

    • Sis Delish

      Probably easier to rescind a pay increase for school administrators than to simply “move out”.

      But, if that is your answer, oh well.

  • copperbill

    Nicole Spriggs 2013. Salary per Open Books app. $101,000

  • Summer Smart

    Confused here on where the low averages came from if the salary expense for teachers is 15,064,000 and there are 175 full time teachers, it would average to 86,000. If you add the benefits to the teachers for a total of 20,629,000 the average income would be 117,880. What am I missing here?

    • Haras Smith

      Did you get the info from http://www.teachersalaryinfo.com? If you add up the expenditures listed and compare it to the total expenditures they have listed, they are not the same. Also if you take the average teacher’s salary of $47,706 and multiply it by the 175 full time teachers it shows 8,348,550 which is closer to the number you get when you add the breakdown of teacher’s expenses (9,182,000). Not sure how accurate all of their info is.

      • Summer Smart

        yes, that is where I found the information. Thank you.

  • that guy

    extra vacation time is just being cashed in………